View of The Barn from the south

 

Our Boathouses

We have two boathouses along the Columbia River at the foot of Ninth Street in Wenatchee. The first one we put to use was originally built as a log barn in the 1930s. The second is a metal storage shed constructed by the Chelan County PUD.

Old barn boathouse

Sometimes just referred to as "The Barn", the picturesque log structure has long been a favorite of the entire community. Park visitors often take photos of the structure or have others pose in front of it. Artists draw and paint it into their landscapes.

The barn was constructed by John Edward "Ed" Lindston near his family's home. Lindston, who came to the United States from Sweden with his parents in 1892, worked as an orchardist, gold miner, builder and mechanic. The family settled in the Wenatchee Valley in 1907.

"He mined in the Lyman Glacier. He went to Moses Coulee and rounded up wild horses. He built houses in Wenatchee and Seattle. He had an interest in everything, but he never got rich," said his grandson Cal Blackburn in 2006. "Most people never do chasing gold."

In a 1989 article in The Wenatchee World, Lindston's daughter, Ovidia Blackburn of Cashmere, said her father constructed the barn in the 1930s using lumber from an Omak mill. Blackburn said the barn's basement served as the home for Jersey cows; the middle floor was her father's shop, where he built, among other things, boats; and the top floor was set aside for storage.

Blackburn also said a nearby creek "was known as a healing spring in the old days."

The barn was later sold to John Jacobson and Rich Congdon, before being acquired by the Chelan County PUD as part of today's expansive Walla Walla Point Park.

Annex boathouse

In 2009, the Chelan County PUD leased to the Row and Paddle Club the metal building near Ninth Street and Walla Walla Avenue. The building was converted into a second boathouse to alleviate overcrowding at the original boathouse.